Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Geology’ Category

Blackhand Gorge — Part 2

I actually cheated a little bit at the end of Blackhand Gorge — Part 1 when I showed you the bike path through Deep Cut (for, not as I originally wrote, the electric Interurban, but the Central Ohio Railroad, and then later the B. & O.). That wasn’t part of my barefoot hike.

When I took that picture I was on inline skates.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

There are a number of places in Ohio where the rivers run “backwards”. I’ve written about Clear Creek and Salt Creek. Their current configurations came about when their original outlet was blocked by glaciers and they carved a new route in the other direction.

Blackhand Gorge, through which the Licking River flows, is another such location.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

I’ve been having fun lately looking a bit at the geology and topographic maps of southeastern Ohio. Earlier, in Great Sealer’s Ghost!, I showed a color-coded elevation map. Well, I have here another one showing more of the highlands east of the Scioto River between Circleville and Chillicothe.

[Yes, I know that calling them "highlands" is a bit presumptuous. But this is Ohio after all, and "high" in Ohio is a lot different than "high" in Colorado. In this case, the "mountains" in the Great Seal region "tower" over Chillicothe by a full 650 feet.]

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Yesterday Columbus Metro Parks had a short organized hike up to Memory Rock. One nice thing about Memory Rock (in rememberance of the property owners who donated much of the park land) is that it gives a nice view of a long stretch of the Clear Creek Valley.

The temperature was around 35°, which wasn’t too bad except we were also stopping to examine various evergreens in the park. In order to keep bare feet warm, it helps to keep moving and pumping warm blood through them.

Here’s a view of the topography with the park boundary marked in black:

(more…)

Read Full Post »

The Kettle Hills

Yesterday I did a bit of hiking in the Kettle Hills, and I went right above (or nearly above) Kettle Hill Cave. I’d first read about it in The Archeological History of the Hocking Valley, by James L. Murphy. It is also written about in Charles Goslin’s Crossroads and Fence Corners: Historical Lore of Fairfield County. Charles Goslin was a local historian who described various historical features in Fairfield County.

The interesting thing about Kettle Hill Cave is that is it a “dry” cave.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Three Knobs

Central Ohio, particularly around Lancaster, is right on a geological boundary. This is about as far as the glaciers came during the ice ages, and it is also right at the edge of Appalachia. Hocking Hills, where I hike a lot, is really the remotest of foothills.

I’ve mentioned before about the Blackhand Sandstone that gives the interesting formations in the area, like spectacular recess caves.

But right at the boundary with the glaciated area, we get sandstone knobs.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Kline Hollow Keratin

The reason I wrote yesterday’s entry on Barefooted Mindfulness is because the day before I spent the time hiking, mostly bushwhacking, in Hocking Hills. And as I was doing so, I realized that I really wasn’t watching too carefully where I put my feet. That caused me to think about the stages of barefooting and just how much trust I was putting into my well-keratinized soles.

What do I mean by well-keratinized?

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 368 other followers

%d bloggers like this: